Eye Library

Contact Lenses

  • Contacts For You?
    The vast majority of people requiring vision correction can wear contact lenses without any problems. New materials and lens care technologies have made today’s contacts more comfortable, safer and easier to wear. Consider the questions and answers below
  • Colored Contacts
    Contact lenses aren’t just for seeing better. They’re for looking better too. In fact, some people who don’t even need vision correction wear tinted contact lenses as a way to change their look.
  • Lens Care Solutions
    When you are fitted for contact lenses a particular lens care system is recommended — a group of products to clean, disinfect and make your lenses safe and comfortable for wear.
  • Presbyopia
    As baby boomers reach middle age, the question looms large: How to avoid either of two telltale signs of aging — bifocals or reading glasses?
  • Soft vs. RGP Lenses
    Below is a brief comparison of Soft and Rigid Gas Permeable (RGP) contact lenses. A thorough eye examination and a better understanding of your specific vision requirements will help determine the best options for you.
  • Teens & Contacts
    Oh, the pressure! Get great grades, excel in at least one sport, play a musical instrument, work part-time, hang out with friends — and always, always look cool. If you’re a teenager today, much is expected.
  • Types of Contacts
    Confused about contacts? Advances in contact lens technologies have created many options in addition to hard and soft lenses. Today, contact lenses are likely to be described in one or several of the following ways.
  • Wear & Care Tips
    The information below is intended as a supplement to the training and instruction you receive as part of a contact lens fitting program.

Eye Diseases

  • ARMD
    Age related macular degeneration or ARMD is the most common cause of irreversible vision loss for people over the age of 60. It is estimated that 2.5 million people in developed countries will suffer visual loss from this disorder and that there are appro
  • Blepharitis
    If your eyelid rims are red and irritated, if they burn and itch or if you’ve noticed an oily discharge or scaly skin around them, you may have an inflammatory problem called “blepharitis”. Some people describe it as “psoriasis of the eyelids”.
  • Conjunctivitis
    Red, watery eyes, inflamed lids, blurred vision and a sandy or scratchy feeling in the eyes may indicate that you have conjunctivitis. Pus-like or watery discharge around the eyelids may indicate an infectious form of the disease, commonly known as “pink”.
  • Diabetes
    Diabetes, a disease that prevents your body from making or using insulin to break down sugar in your bloodstream, can affect your eyes and your vision.
  • Dry Eye
    If your eyes sting, itch or burn, you may be experiencing the common signs of “dry eye.” A feeling of something foreign within the eye or general discomfort may also signal dry eye.
  • Glaucoma
    The most scary thing about glaucoma is that it can steal your vision gradually and without your noticing. The best defense against glaucoma is a regular eye examination. Glaucoma most often strikes people over age 50. But it is recommended that during adu
  • Styes
    A small area of redness and pain on the margin of your eyelid may indicate that you have a stye, known in medical terms as an external hordeolum. A stye is a blocked gland at the edge of the lid that has become infected by bacteria, usually Staphylococcus

Vision Problems

  • Astigmatism
    If you experience a distortion or blurring of images at all distances — nearby as well as far — you may have astigmatism. Even if your vision is fairly sharp, headache, fatigue, squinting and eye discomfort or irritation may indicate a slight degree of
  • Cataracts
    While a comprehensive eye examination can determine for certain if you have a cataract forming, there are a number of signs and symptoms that may indicate a cataract.
  • Double Vision
    If you see two of whatever you are looking at, you may have a condition known as double vision, also referred to as diplopia.
  • Hyperopia
    If you can see objects at a distance clearly but have trouble focusing well on objects close up, you may be farsighted. Farsightedness or long-sightedness is often referred to by its medical names, hypermetropia or hyperopia.
  • Keratoconus
    Poor vision that cannot be corrected fully with glasses may indicate a condition known as conical cornea or keratoconus. A rare condition, keratoconus primarily affects people in their early 20’s.
  • Myopia
    If you can see objects nearby with no problem, but reading road signs or making out the writing on the board at school is more difficult, you may be near- or shortsighted.
  • Presbyopia
    Hold the book up close and the words appear blurred. Push the book farther away, and the words snap back into sharp focus. That’s how most of us first recognize a condition called presbyopia, a name derived from Greek words meaning “old eye.”
  • Spots & Floaters
    Do you occasionally see specks or threadlike strands drifting across your field of vision? Then, when you try to look at them, do they seem to dart away? If so, you’re seeing what eye care practitioners call spots or floaters

Your Eyes and Vision

  • Children’s Vision
    Good vision involves many different skills working together to enable your child not only to see clearly but also to understand what he or she sees.
  • How the Eye Works
    Our ability to “see” starts when light reflects off an object at which we are looking and enters the eye.
  • Mature Vision
    Most changes in vision occur in the early and later years of life.
  • Reading and Vision
    Good vision is vital to reading well. And although vision may not be the only cause of reading difficulties, it is one that is sometimes overlooked.
  • Television and Vision
    Eye care experts generally agree: Watching television will not harm your eyes or vision if the TV room is lit properly and if you follow a few viewing tips.

A wealth of vision resources for you on the net.. Click Away.

  • All About Vision
    A comprehensive patient guide to various new products and vision health concerns.
  • Computer Vision Syndrome
    Learn more about computer vision syndrome (CVS) – a very real problem for many people who spend hours daily in front of a computer screen.
  • Info on Refractive Surgery
    This site offers a balanced view on Laser Vision Correction as well as other types of refractive surgery.
  • A Comprehensive Guide to Age-Related Macular Degeneration
    In this article, we’ll discuss what age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is, what the common symptoms are, how it can be treated and the ways it can be controlled. We’ll also explore some frequently asked questions about the condition.